Stuart Reid Sparks Student Creativity During Author Visit

Nov 12
2021

Students in Year 5 and 6 along with some year 7 students took part in special creative writing sessions with award-winning author, Stuart Reid this week.

The Gorgeous George writer delivered interactive creative workshops to classes and worked with students on the foundations of story writing, such as plot, settings, character development, genres and story starter strategy.

Students also had the opportunity to take part in a virtual Q&A with the author and to buy signed copies of the writer’s books.

Those who have not yet ordered a book can place a postal order by contacting Mrs Allman. We will also be purchasing a selection of the author’s books for the school library.

Year 5 Literacy Lead Mrs Allman, said: “The students have really engaged with the visit in an amazing way. They’ve had smiles on their faces during the workshops and a creative sparkle in their eyes. Everyone’s been asking questions and it’s been great to see every single child taking part. It’s been an absolute delight having Mr Reid in to work with our students and we can’t wait to see how they put his creative writing tips to use.”

Mr Reid was very complimentary about the interest and efforts of the pupils he worked with, he said: “It was an absolute pleasure to work with the pupils at James Calvert Spence College this week. All the sessions were great fun, and the energy, contribution and laughter from the pupils was fabulous. Also, the teachers were wonderfully supportive… and I hope they enjoyed themselves too.

“The last 18 months has been a challenge for both schools and authors, with no visits or visitors, no book festivals and external learning. As we begin coming out of the darkness, we are reminded out the importance of author visits, pupil engagement and the joy of reading and writing for pleasure. Huge thanks go to Mrs Allman for hosting my visit, and to Gil Pugh, from Hexham Book Festival for her organisation. It was a terrific couple of days, and the pupils were a credit to their school.”

file